Demographics of COVID-19 Positive Cases

Number of Positive Cases Over Time in Madison County

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The graph above represents the number of active and recovered cases of 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) in Madison County, New York over time. Both active and recovered cases have tested positive for COVID-19. Active cases represent individuals who are either in home isolation, being monitored by the Health Department, or under the care of a hospital. Recovered cases represent individuals who have recovered from the infection and are no longer in isolation. Those individuals are still encouraged to follow social distancing practices.

NOTE: The significant increase in active cases beginning May 4th is a result of a targeted testing site hosted by Madison County Health Department (denoted by blue bars).

COVID-19 Testing in Madison County

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The graph shows 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) tests conducted in Madison County, New York over time. To date, there are been over 3,570 COVID-19 tests administered to County residents with 3,165 (88.4%) negative and 336 (9.4%) positive results. There are currently 72 (2.0%) test results pending. The turnaround time for test results varies between laboratory facilities. Data shows test result information received by Madison County Health Department.

Demographics of COVID-19 Positive Cases in Madison County

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The 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) affects about the same number of women compared to men in Madison County.

A person of any age can become infected with COVID-19. Individuals in Madison County, who have tested positive for
COVID-19 range from 5 to 107 years old. Older adults and individuals of any age with serious chronic medical conditions (e.g. heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are more likely to develop severe illness from COVID-19.

Medical Conditions & Health Risk Behaviors among Patients with COVID-19

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Among COVID-19 patients in Madison County, 76% have at least one underlying medical condition or smoking history. Among COVID-19 patients who have been hospitalized, 93% have an underlying medical condition or a history of smoking. Heart issues include heart disease, atrial fibrillation (AFib), heart murmur, or arrhythmia (irregular heartbeat). Smoking history includes people who currently smoke or have in the past. Unhealthy weight is defined as having a body mass index (BMI) of 25 or more. BMI is measured using a person’s weight and height. Note: data reflects only cases with medical history available.

Reasons for Initial Testing for COVID-19 among Positive Cases 

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Among COVID-19 patients in Madison County, about 84% of cases list a reason for COVID-19 testing. Targeted testing sites account for the most common reason that individuals received testing. Outside of testing sites, the other reasons for testing include possible contact exposure (24%), cough (20%), ruling out influenza or other respiratory illness (18%), fever (13%), respiratory distress (12%), acute respiratory infection (9%), and unspecified viral infection (6%). Please note that a patient may meet one or multiple of these conditions.  

Social Distancing Score

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Click map for Madison County’s current grade for reducing our average mobility. This grade is calculated based on the amount of change in distance traveled by community members as well as the number of non-essential visits. 

It is important to recognize that rural community members often travel longer distances to places like grocery stores, work sites, and retailers. Traveling a large distance does not equal encountering more people. However, this data compares mobility before and after the COVID-19 outbreak, taking into consideration the normal travel patterns of each area.
To learn more, visit: https://www.unacast.com/covid19/social-distancing-scoreboard.

Madison County Public Health encourages everyone to reduce their movement. Avoid all unnecessary trips to public places, including social gatherings with people outside your household. The decision each of us makes today will impact us all tomorrow.

Page last updated on May 26, 2020 at 8:39AM.
Local data will be updated weekday mornings.