Car Seat Safety Checks

The dates of the next Madison County car seat safety checks not been determined for the upcoming spring and summer of 2018. Please check back later for event dates.

At every care seat check we have certified staff from the Sheriff’s Office, NYS Police, Health Department, and CAP to help the parent/caregiver make any corrections, so that children are leaving the event safer than when they arrived.

See below for Car Seat Recommendations for Children from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) or click the link to view our updated Public Health Car Seat Safety Brochure.

The message to parents and caregivers is:

Do not be in a rush to move your child to the next stage because they’re safest in the stage they’re in until they can’t fit in it any longer.

Car Seat Recommendations for Children

  • Select a car seat based on your child's age and size, and choose a seat that fits in your vehicle and use it every time.
  • Always refer to your specific car seat manufacturer's instructions. Read the vehicle owner's manual on how to install the seat using the seat belt or LATCH system, and check height and weight limits.
  • To maximize safety, keep your child in the car seat for as long as possible, as long as the child fits within the manufacturer's height and weight requirements.
  • Keep your child in the back seat at least through age 12.

Birth Through 12 Months

Your child under age 1 should always ride in a rear facing car seat.

There are different types of rear-facing car seats. Infant only seats can only be used rear-facing. Convertible and 3-in-1 car seats typically have higher height and weight limits for the rear-facing position, allowing you to keep your child rear-facing for a longer period of time.

1 to 3 Years

Keep your child rear-facing as long as possible. It's the best way to keep him or her safe. Your child should remain in a rear-facing car seat until he or she reaches the top weight or height limit allowed by your car seat's manufacturer. Once your child outgrows the rear-facing car seat, your child is ready to travel in a forward-facing car seat with a harness.

4 to 7 Years

Keep your child in a forward-facing car seat with a harness until he or she reaches the top height or weight limit allowed by your car seat's manufacturer. Once your child outgrows the forward-facing car seat with a harness, it's time to travel in a booster seat, but still in the back seat.

8 to 12 Years

Keep your child in a booster seat until he or she is big enough to fid in a seat belt properly. For a seat belt to fit properly, the lap belt must lie snugly across the upper thighs, not the stomach. The shoulder belt should lie snug across the shoulder and chest, and not across the neck and face. Remember: Your child should still ride in the back seat because it's safer there.

Description (Restraint Type)

  • A rear-facing car seat is the best seat for your young child to use. It has a harness and in a crash, cradles and moves with your child to reduce the stress to the child's fragile neck and spinal cord.
  • A forward-facing car seat has a harness and tether that limits your child's forward movement during a crash.
  • A booster seat positions the seat belt so that it fits properly over the stronger parts of your child's body
  • A seat belt should lie across the upper thighs and be snug across the shoulder and chest to restrain the child safely in a crash. It should not rest on the stomach area or across the n